Big Banks Will Take Depositors Money In Next Crash -Ellen Brown

4By Greg Hunter’s USAWatchdog.com 

The G-20 met recently in Australia to make new banking rules for the next financial calamity.  Financial reform advocate Ellen Brown says these new rules will allow banks to take money from depositors and pensioners globally.  Brown explains, “It became rules we agreed to actually implement.  There was no treaty, and Congress didn’t agree to all this.  They use words so that it’s not obvious to tell what they have done, but what they did was say, basically, that we, the governments, are no longer going to be responsible for bailing out the big banks.  These are about 30 international banks.  So, you are going to have to save yourselves, and the way you are going to have to do it is by bailing in the money of your creditors.  The largest class of creditors of any bank is the depositors.” 

It gets worse, as Brown goes on to say, “Theoretically, we are protected by deposit insurance up to $250,000 in the U.S. and 100,000 euros in Europe.  The FDIC fund has $46 billion, the last time I looked, to cover $4.5 trillion worth of deposits.  There is also $280 trillion worth of derivatives that the five biggest banks in the U.S. are exposed to, and under the bankruptcy reform act of 2005, derivatives go first.  So, they are basically exempt from these new rules.  They just snatch the collateral.  So, if you had a big derivatives bust that brought down JP Morgan or Bank of America, there is no way there is going to be collateral left for the FDIC or for the secured depositors.  This would include state and local governments.  They all put their money in these big banks.  So, even though we are protected by the FDIC, the FDIC is not going to have the money. . . . This makes it legal for these big 30 banks to take our money when they become insolvent.  They are too-big-to-fail.  This was supposed to avoid too-big-to-fail, but what it does is institutionalizes too-big-to-fail.  They are not going to go down.  They are going to take our money instead.” 

Part of the coming financial calamity will involve hundreds of trillions of dollars in un-backed derivatives.  Brown contends, “If the derivative bubble pops, nobody knows what is going to happen, and it’s obvious it has to pop.  It can’t just keep growing.  Depending on who you read, some people say it is up to two quadrillion dollars.  It’s virtual money, and it cannot keep going on.”

When a financial crash does happen, you can forget about getting immediate access to your money.  Brown says, “The banks will say, well, we don’t have it.  All the money goes into one big pool since Glass Steagall was repealed.  They are allowed to gamble with that money and that’s what they do.  I think maybe Bank of America is the most vulnerable because of Merrill Lynch.  Everybody is concerned, and they do very risky deals and they are on the edge.  I think they have over $50 trillion in derivatives and over $1 trillion in deposits. . . The Dodd-Frank Act says we, the people, are no longer going to be responsible for the big banks when they collapse.  It is not clear the FDIC will even be able to borrow from the Treasury, but even if they could, who is going to pay that money back?  Let’s say they borrowed $1 trillion.  Who is going to pay that $1 trillion back?  It will bankrupt all the small banks that had to contribute to this premium.  They will say we’re raising your premium to everything you got, basically.  Little banks will go out of business, and who is going to survive–the big banks. . . . What we’re going to have left is five big banks, and everybody else is going to be bankrupt.”

Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Ellen Brown from the Web of Debt Blog. 

(There is much more in the video interview.)

After the Interview:

4Ellen Brown is an expert on public banking.  In 2013 she wrote “The Public Bank Solution: From Austerity to Prosperity.”  For a copy of this book, click here.  Brown is working on a new book which will be about bail-ins and big global banks.  She has not set a release date.  If you would like to keep up with articles Brown writes, you can follow her work on the Web of Debt Blog which can be found on EllenBrown.com.

 

Stay Connected
Comments
  1. Mr. Impatient

    Greg,

    Please please please for the love of God when you ask these people a question, just ask the question and then stop talking for 3o more seconds and elaborating on and on and on!!!! My goodness, I was screaming at the computer listening to this great interview saying shut up and let her just answer the question !!!!!! Now go back and listen to your awesome interview and you’ll see what I mean. And if you don’t see it, ask someone to watch it that you trust and let them tell you!!!!!!!!!!! Sorry man, I love your interviews but you’re killing me here.

    • Smaulgld

      Disagree Greg’s interjections are often helpful requests for clarification